Professor Hathaway gives solo exhibition in Santiago de Compostela Spain

Professor Janice Hathaway had a solo exhibition of her Surrealist collage at The Eugenio Granell Fundación in Santiago de Compostela Spain from May 26 – July 10 2016. Granell’s daughter, Executive Director Natalia Fernandez, extended the invitation as part of a year of women Surrealist exhibitions in honor of her mother and Granell’s wife Amparo Segarra.

Eugenio Granell was the last Spanish Surrealist of the early Surrealist movement. The Eugenio Granell Fundación is the only museum in the world dedicated exclusively to the movement. The Eugenio Granell Fundación opened in 1995 in his home town of Santiago de Compostela and holds 600 of Granell’s paintings along with works by Picabia, Duchamp, Man Ray and Breton and now two photo-collages by Janice Hathaway.

Janice met with the staff from The Eugenio Granell Fundación before the exhibition to discuss framing and the exhibition installation. On the day of the opening, an interview was held in the gallery. The interview was in Spanish so the questions and answers were translated. The Eugenio Granell Fundación board members, staff and the Galician community attended the opening reception.

Janice Hathaway’s book for the exhibition Liquid Solaris

A book, Janice Hathaway, was published as part of her Liquid Solaris exhibition. This bilingual English and Spanish book has an introduction by Natalia Fernandez, a preface and essays by LaDonna Smith, Davey Williams, Laurens Vancrevel, Marcia Morse, and Franklin Rosemont and a “Why/because” game by Merl Fluin and Paul Cowdell. Ruurdje Laarhoven wrote a biography that includes photographs from the early Raudelunas years, dance photographs of Sylvia Toffel, early TransMuseq photographs and current photos of surrealist colleagues.

The book includes two essays by Janice Hathaway. One essay is a step-by-step explanation of her digital process with “screen shots” of the steps, and the second is about how she makes her photo-collages. This essay begins in the 1980s with work made from hand-colored photographic paper, and continues through the development of her digital photo-collage process that she uses today.

There are fifty-two color photo-collages starting with work from 1980s and continuing with a sequence of her photo-collages demonstrating the collage approach ending with her current digital photo-collages.

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